Izzi Abrams becomes President at JCCNS

JCC-Izzi-COmmNewsSummer2018

Izzi Abrams at the JCCNS Annual Meeting, where she was inaugurated as President for the 2018-2020 term. “I’ve come full circle,” she said.

Shelley A. Sackett

Rabbi Michael Ragozin, of Congregation Shirat Hayam, began the opening invocation at the June 3 Annual Meeting of the The Jewish Community Center of the North Shore on a personal note, remarking how much the JCCNS had become even more of a blessing to him after he tore his ACL.

 

He noticed the subtle nuances during his many months of recovery. “This is not just a place to rehab or workout. It’s about the people. The JCC is a promoter of relationships and community,” he said to a crowd of more than 115, many of whom nodded their heads in agreement.

JCC-Ragozin (SAS)

Rabbi Michael Ragozin gave the invocation.

 

President John Gilberg, who handed over the reins to Izzi Abrams, reflected on his 2-year term. “I grew up in this building. I went to nursery school here, so for me being president was especially rewarding,” he said.

 

John and Marty

Marty Schneer, JCCNS Executive Director, presents outgoing President John Gilberg with a framed print of L’dor v’dor (“from generation to generation”).

 

Two of the biggest challenges he faced were balancing the needs of the many different groups that use the JCC — it is a school, workout center, summer camp, senior center and community source of Jewish programming — and keeping its financial boat afloat.

 

“I give kudos to Executive Director Marty Schneer, who manages all the J’s facets expertly,” Gilberg said. He credits CFO Tom Cheatham with anchoring the financial information and providing numbers “like we never had before.” This allows management to act quickly, adjusting programming that isn’t meeting expectations.

 

Annual revenue and net surplus both increased in 2017, and the endowment grew by $1.5 million, creeping closer to its $5 million goal. “My happiest moment will be when we hit that $5 million,” Gilberg said.

 

Schneer drew laughter introducing the new board and officer installation ceremony as “part of peaceful transition of leadership,” handing over the microphone to Barbara Schneider, Jewish Journal Publisher Emerita and JCCNS life-board member and past President, to do the honors.

 

She introduced Abrams as “our community’s cultural guru” and advised her, above all, to “have fun and do good.”

 

Abrams spoke of growing up in Worcester, where her father, Rabbi Abraham Kazis, served as her role model for taking leadership roles in the Jewish community. “He was a humble leader, a man of the people,” she said. “I hope to emulate him in engaging new members.”

 

Over the years, Abrams has been President of the local chapter of ORT (a non-profit global organization that provides education and skills training for needy Jewish communities); Chairs of the Holocaust Center and Youth to Israel Program; President of the Jewish Journal and Chair of the JCCNS International Jewish Film Festival.

 

When Abrams, an early childhood educator, first arrived on the North Shore, she was approached by Bea Paul to join the JCC as an afternoon kindergarten enrichment teacher. Over the next 10 years, she continued to work at the JCC in various areas, including teen and adult services, eventually becoming Director of the Preschool. She retired in 1994 and now is Co-Head of Children’s Services at the Swampscott Public Library.

 

Of becoming JCCNS President, she said,” I’ve come full circle.”

 

She stressed that the JCC is welcoming for all who want to be involved in giving back to an agency that has done so much for this community. “I invite you to join me on this journey,” she said to a standing ovation.

 

Bea Paul then presented Jason Garry, JCCNS Director of Facilities, with the Bea Paul Professional Staff Award and JCCNS Life Board Member Michael Eschelbacher presented Virginia Dodge, longtime JCCNS supporter and member, with the Samuel S. Stahl Community Service Award.

 

New JCCNS Board of Directors members, whose 2-year terms will expire in 2020, are: John Gilberg, Betsy Rooks, Shari Cashman, Anthony Chamay, Daniel Gelb, Peter Short, MD, Susan Syversen, Courtney Weisman, Sara Winer and Joseph Zang.

 

Joining President Abrams as officers are Vice Presidents Randall Patkin MD and Adam Forman, Treasurer Michael Goldstein MD and Secretary Kate Clayman.

 

After Abrams’ family said the Hamotzei, a sumptuous brunch was served, including a table of irresistible desserts prepared by Sara Winer’s “Sara’s Baked Goods and Specialties.”

Sara's goodies

While attendees sat at tables enjoying their food, the lobby was abuzz with people coming from and going to classes. Former JCCNS Executive Director Sandy Sheckman commented, “Isn’t it amazing how, while all this is going on in here, the JCC is still alive with activity out there.”

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Texting not allowed — senior and fourth grade pen pals keep alive the old fashioned tradition of writing letters

 

Paul Calsimitto and Bill Hyde, Sr

Hadley fourth grader Paul Calsimitto and his senior pen pal, Bill Hyde, Sr

 

By Shelley A. Sackett

To the casual observer, last Wednesday looked like just another noontime at the Swampscott Senior. The lunch tables were set, the bingo spinning wheel was in place, and the alluring aroma of pizza wafted from the kitchen.

 

But at 12 o’clock sharp, the Senior Center van pulled up to the front door with a surprise. When its doors opened, out poured a throng of excited and agile Hadley fourth grade students, ready to meet their senior pen pals for the first time.

 

Since last October, Julie O’Brien’s class has corresponded with volunteer seniors from Swampscott the old fashioned way: by writing letters. “This experience was wonderful. I wish the seniors had a chance to see the look on the kids’ faces when they opened their letters. It was amazing to see the joy as they discovered new things about their new friends,” O’Brien said.

 

The intergenerational program was started 6 years ago by Marilyn Cassidy as a way to connect seniors and young children. Gina Bush, whose son William is in O’Brien’s class, chaired the program this year.

Chairperson Gina Bush serves pizza to Noah Murphy

Chairperson Gina Bush serves pizza to Noah Murphy

 

“The best part is the connection the seniors made with the class,” she said as she looked around the dining room. “It’s fun to see how well some of them are getting along and to see them meet face-to-face for the first time.”

 

The exercise is not just for fun, however; there is also a pedagogic and life skills component. The students learned to write a formal letter, how to address an envelope and how to share personal information with someone they had never met.

 

When the class received mail from the senior center, all the students would open their letters and read them at their desks. Then they would all meet “on the rug” to share something new they had learned about their new friend, O’Brien said.

Hadley fouorth grade teacher Julie O'Brien

Hadley fourth grade teacher Julie O’Brien

 

Some pen pals were uncannily well matched. Student Paul Calsimitto’s father is a fireman in Revere. His pen pal, Bill Hyde, Sr. was a Swampscott fireman for over two decades, including a period as Fire Chief. “My dad was very surprised,” Calsimitto said. “He thought it was kind of funny.”

 

For Hyde, who has been part of the program since its first year and has kept in contact with several of his former pen pals, it’s not just about getting to know a fourth grader. “It’s an opportunity to learn about their parents, their brothers, sisters. It’s almost like I have another family,” he said.

 

First time pen pal Rick Pierro, who retired from his advertising agency, Designer’s Eye, has always wanted to be a big brother, but hasn’t gotten around to it yet. Although he has lots of nieces and nephews, he has no children and loved having a pen this year. “My only complaint is it takes too long between letters,” he said with a chuckle.

Noah Murphy and Rick Pierro

Noah Murphy and Rick Pierro

 

His pen pal, Noah Murphy, really liked learning about Pierro through their correspondence. What amazed him the most? “I was surprised he wants to be a champion chef and enter in the Julia Child competition,” Murphy said as Pierro grinned.

 

After lunch, seniors and fourth graders teamed up to play four rounds of bingo, bonding even more in lessons of frustration, good sportsmanship and gracious winning.

Norma Freedman and Talia Pagliaro

Norma Freedman and Talia Pagliaro

 

Norma Freedman, who chaired the program last year, was happy to just relax this year. She enjoyed her Italian ice with her pen pal, Talia Pagliaro, who was surprised to learn Freedman’s children attended Hadley and said she couldn’t have asked for a better pen pal. “Whenever she talked about something, she put a lot of thought into it,” Pagliaro said with a big smile.

Shelley Sackett and Caden Ross

Shelley Sackett and Caden Ross

 

Last but hardly least, each pen pal received a card and envelope. They addressed the envelope to themselves and exchanged them, with the intent of keeping the correspondence going over the summer. After all, as Caden Ross enthusiastically put it, “It’s fun!”

Salem Garden Club celebrates its 90th anniversary

Church Stroll

 

By Shelley A. Sackett

On January 7, 1928, 20 men and women met at the home of Mr. Wilis H. Ropes. Bound by a love of gardening, the mostly married couples had decided to form the Salem Garden Club, a Salem mainstay that celebrated its longevity on May 20 with a 90th Anniversary Tea and Social at the First Church.

 

Mayor Kim Driscoll was on hand to express Salem’s appreciation. “It was an honor to recognize the club’s 90 years of dedicated service beautifying our city, sharing horticultural knowledge and providing social enterprise to members young and old,” she posted on her Facebook page.

 

Co-pres.

Co-Presidents Meg McMahon and Tracy Rubin at the 90th Anniversary Tea and Social.

On display were artifacts from years gone by, including old program books, photos, certificates of recognition, handwritten thank you notes from the people of Britain for seeds sent in the 1950’s and a slide show of special moments over the last nine decades. “Some members wore hats, which added to the festive atmosphere,” said SGC 2017-2019 Co-president Meg McMahon.

 

Following its 1928 establishment, the club’s first decades of existence were marked by much activity. It joined the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts in 1929 and participated in the annual spring Flower Show in Boston that same year.

 

Members

Members Eleanor Soucy, Rosemary Mroz, Mimi Ballou, Jane Koza, and Judy Giunta at the 90th Anniversary Tea and Social held on May 20, 2018.

 

At the suggestion of local architect Philip Horton Smith, members rebuilt the garden at the Brookhouse Home on Derby Street. For a few years in the 1930’s, SGC sponsored a garden contest for children involved in the Salem summer playground program. With cash prizes for the best home gardens, the event was a summer favorite.

 

To celebrate the club’s 10th anniversary in 1938, the ambitious membership sponsored the city’s first garden tour, opening to the public ten gardens on Federal and Chestnut Streets and others along the Salem Common. Called “Open Garden Day,” the event drew over 600 people at $1.00 each, and the club raised enough money to hold its own horticultural show in historic Hamilton Hall on Chestnut Street the next year.

 

The club sponsored a second, smaller garden tour in 1941 to celebrate the opening of the Gardener-Pingree House on Essex Street, designed by Salem architect Samuel McIntire. As one of its missions, SGC had taken on the responsibility for replanting the gardens at this magnificent Federal mansion.

 

Library

Spring arrangement at the Salem Public Library.

 

Over the next decade, WWII interfered with the club’s many activities, although conservation chairperson Mrs. Willis Ropes advised citizens on how to plant their own war gardens. Never ones to remain idle, members began diaries with interesting facts and entertaining anecdotes about their own gardens. “Old Salem Gardens,” a compilation of these entries, was published in 1946 and remains available for purchase 72 years later.

 

McMahon, who has been a club member since 1999, described the SGC’s early years, when meetings took place in members’ homes. “Some records indicate that there may have been Saturday night meetings and sherry drinking with lovely flower arrangements set up by one’s maid or butler,” she said.

 

Today, with over 100 active, associate, sustaining and honorary members — all women —, the meetings take place in many venues that can accommodate the club’s growing numbers. Tracy Rubin, who has been a SGC member since 2013, is its co-president.

 

City Hall

Large group of members after winter planting of urns on Washington Street.

 

Another difference is that membership in SGC is “very hands on. Today’s members dig in their own dirt and enjoy refreshments that the hostess committee provides,” McMahon said. Programs typically include presentations by experts in landscape and floral design, environmental studies, local farming and native plants, among many others. Open to the public, the meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month from September through December and from March through June.

 

Although the style and membership of the club has evolved in the last 90 years, McMahon stressed that its traditions, missions and objectives remain unchanged: the advancement of gardening; the development of home grounds; civic beautification, and aiding in the protection of forests, wild flowers and birds.

 

Committed to the beautification of Salem, the club has worked on the Town House Square, planted shrubs and annuals in Lappin Park, donated and planted trees in Salem Common and maintained the gardens at Brookhouse and Emmerton House.

 

Today, SGC’s civic involvement can be spotted in the celebrated large urns on Washington Street, the City Hall window boxes, and the Blue Star Marker on Hawthorne Boulevard. The club also provides monthly floral arrangements to the Salem Public Library and helps judge the window box and traffic island contest during Heritage Days. Each year, one lucky qualifying student receives a generous $1,000 scholarship, courtesy of club members.

 

Blue Star

Blue Star Memorial Marker on Hawthorne Boulevard honoring all Veterans.

 

The club is hardly idle during the winter months. Since the Christmas House Tour began in 1984, SGC members have participated by decorating one of the homes in the annual event. Starting in 1999, the club expanded its involvement to include the Christmas Boutique, where members sell handmade wreaths, swags, boxwood trees and arrangements to raise funds for its activities.

 

In 2017, the club’s biennial Garden Stroll, which highlights gardens in different neighborhoods, featured 15 private gardens in the McIntire District. The club is already busy planning its 2019 Garden Stroll.

 

McMahon has enjoyed her almost 20 years of SGC membership, with its monthly meetings where she has learned much from the many presenters and from fellow members. “Most of all, I’ve loved being a part of a dynamic organization and having the opportunity to meet so many wonderful people,” she said.

 

For more information, visit salemgardenclub.com or its Facebook page.